Amor Sliti, yet another veteran on list of Belgian foreign terrorist fighters

Belgian authorities have added 37 names to the list of persons whose financial assets are frozen as part of the struggle against terrorism. All 251 people listed now are considered foreign terrorist fighters, mainly active in the Syrian-Iraqi conflict. This latest update does include Amor Ben Mohamed Sliti (57), a true veteran of the Belgian jihad.

Amor Ben Mohamed Sliti

 

In the nineties, Sliti was living in Brussels — coming from Tunisia, but naturalized as a Belgian citizen and working in his own automobile repair shop. Late in 1999, he left for Afghanistan with his wife and five children, then aged 2 to 13. It is said that he wanted to start a restaurant and butcher shop in Kabul. But finally he joined al-Qaeda while settling in Jalalabad.[1]

Sliti quickly adapted to the moral standards of the terrorist group by offering his 13 year old daughter as a bride to a Tunisian fighter, Adel Hkimi. Soon the teenage girl became pregnant, but Hkimi never saw his newborn daughter. He was caught shortly after the American invasion of Afghanistan had started at the end of 2001, and by February 2002 he was imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay.

That same fate also met a cousin of Sliti. While living in Italy, Hicham Ben Ali Ben Amor Sliti badly became addicted to drugs. His family sent him to Brussels in order to work in his cousin’s car repair shop as a sort of rehab. But when Amor Sliti left for Afghanistan, he could persuade his cousin that there was no better place to become a decent man — which resulted in twelve years Guantánamo for Hicham.

Amor Sliti kept himself out of the American’s reach. He was caught in February 2002 at the Pakistani-Iranian border and extradited to Belgium. There he was tried in 2003 as an accomplice of Nizar Trabelsi and Malika El Aroud. The latter is the widow of a suicide bomber who killed the Afghan warlord Ahmed Shah Massoud — an ally of the West against the taliban — while Trabelsi planned to blow up an American air base in Belgium.

Sliti was convicted to five years in jail. In December 2010, he also was stripped from his Belgian citizenship — until today one of only four cases. When and how exactly he got involved again in the jihad remains unclear. But it is told that cousin Hicham also has become an ardent supporter of Islamic State after his  transfer from Guantánamo to Slovakia in 2014.

Sliti isn’t the first veteran of Belgian jihad who has surfaced in the ranks of the Islamic State. Earlier, Abdelkader Hakimi was already added to the official Belgian foreign fighters list. Hakimi was a heavyweight of the ‘Groupe Islamique Combattant Marocain’, convicted to eight years in jail by a Belgian court in 2006. In 2014, we revealed that he was in Syria, surrounded by a new generation of Belgian Islamic extremists.

It is well known by now that European veterans often play important roles within the Islamic State. Good examples are two former residents of France, Abdelnasser Benyoucef and Boubaker el-Hakim. The latter was considered as one of the leaders of the Amniyat — Islamic State’s security service — at the moment he was killed in November 2016, while Benyoucef is said to have lead Islamic State’s elite brigade Katibat al-Battar.

It was brought to our attention only very recently, that the Abdel Kader Hakim declared dead by coalition forces in December 2015 might be the Hakimi mentioned above. It would mean that this Belgian veteran also had an important position in the Islamic State’s external operations. The coalition’s press desk couldn’t confirm or deny however, when asked last month whether it was the Belgian Hakimi killed in 2015.

 

[1] Biographical details based on ‘The Forgotten Italian Residents in Guantánamo Bay’, a report from the London based organization Reprieve published in June 2008, but not available on their website anymore — and this article published by the Belgian newspaper Le Soir in February 2002

 


Teenage brother of Abaaoud staged in new threat

A confidant of Abdelhamid Abaaoud, one of the Paris terrorists killed by French police, has made a new threat. He posted a picture of Abaaoud’s brother Younes, insinuating that the 15 year old boy is on his way to Europe for revenge.

Picture of Younes Abaaoud, who is said to vow revenge for the death of his brother Abdelhamid

Picture of Younes Abaaoud, who is said to vow revenge for the death of his brother Abdelhamid

The author of the Facebook message that was posted on Tuesday and reported by the Belgian newspaper ‘Het Laatste Nieuws’, presents the younger Abaaoud as “my dear Abu Mansour”. That is an alias already used by Younes himself, after his brother took him to Syria in January of last year.

“Abu Omar al-Soussi may have been martyred”, the message continues, refering to the police operation in Saint-Denis on the 18th of November in which Abdelhamid died. “But his brother is alive. And we are coming to the worshippers of the cross.”

The picture showing Younes as a soldier isn’t new. It was posted in December of last year already by another IS fighter linked to the Molenbeek brothers. So it isn’t clear whether the author is really in touch with the teenager, and can speak about his plans. From Younes himself nothing was heard on social media recently, although his latest Facebook account still exists.

Other pictures on the author’s Facebook account suggest that he also is in Syria, however. And late last year, the same ‘Abou Soufiane Belgikimohajir’ was connected to Abaaoud’s sister Yasmina, not an extremist herself. A clear sign of his close relationship to Abaaoud.

Nowadays, he is connected both to members of Katibat al-Battar — the elite militia within IS to which Abaaoud belonged — and extremists all over Europe. An example of the latter is Michael ‘Younnes’ Delefortrie, a former Shariah4Belgium member who came back from Syria, was convicted but is free again.